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ICME National Awards 2013

ICME National Awards 2013

The ICME 2013 Awards are presented to those in the cast metals industry who have exhibited excellence in their field and commitment to the cast metals industry and, in many cases, to ICME itself.

E J Fox Award

  • Awarded to Michael Brown IEng FICME
    Spanning over four decades in the castings industry, Mike Brown IEng FICME has worked with many of the most celebrated names in the international foundry sector and has been a member of four ICME branches. Mike started his career at Leys Malleable, which went on to become Georg Fischer, where he worked for 15 years rising to the heights of technical manager. He then had on a spell overseas, initially as foundry manager at Kuwait Foundry then as general manager at Western Castings, Takoradi, Ghana before returning to the UK to become foundry manager at Sandusky. He then joined Stanton Castings plc in the role of production manager before embarking on a range of consultancy projects with Knight Wendling. He now has his own business, MB Associates, where he carries out consultancy and engineering projects for foundries worldwide. Mike’s association with the Institute began in 1968 when he joined as a student. His initial involvement being with the, now disbanded, Lincolnshire branch where he says he learned “an amazing amount” at branch meetings from experienced practical foundrymen. He has also been a member of the Scottish and East Midlands branches and is currently a member of the West Midlands, Birmingham and Coventry branch. Throughout his illustrious career he has worked with the likes of Jack Hill, Robert Carswell, Roy Grundy, Sam Apsley and Andrew Turner, to name but a few, and he has continued to develop his broad technical and commercial knowledge of the casting production process and industry. In being chosen as an E J Fox Medal recipient he said: “I consider this an enormous honour. I still believe in the Institute for what it should and ought to be – practical foundrymen sharing knowledge.”

Honorary Fellow

  • Awarded to David Fletcher FREng CEng FIM
    David has been the Honorary Treasurer for ICME since 2003, having been the National President in 1999 when he was a Director of Sheffield Forgemasters Ltd. He has also served as a Director of the then Castings Development Centre and Chairman of the Dti's Casting 2000+ panel as well as on the Board of the UK Manufacturing Foresight Panel. David began his career working for the Weir Group and later the Aurora Group, have attained a first class degree in Matallurgical Engineering and Management from Loughborough University. He joined the institute in 1965 and was appointed a Fellow in 1986. David has served as the President of hte Sheffield Branch and was awarded a Long and Notable Services Award in 1997 and a Meritorious Services award in 2005. As Honorary Treasurer David has always ensured that the institute meets its objectives as a charity to serve the training and development needs of members and the wider industry through technical events, the journal and training activities.

John Campbell Medal

  • Awarded to Dr Phil Ramsell CEng FICME
    Dr Ramsell is a Chartered Engineer and a Fellow of the Institute. He is also a former Fellow of the Institute of Mechanical Engineers and of the Institute of Energy. He started his association with the castings industry almost 40 years ago. Much of his work has been with furnaces, in the beginning specializing in heat treatment and subsequently for melting non-ferrous metals with both electricity and gas. During the late 1970s he pioneered the use of electric resistance furnace technology – particularly for melting aluminium. At that time he developed a working relationship with Naber Industieofenbau in Germany and in 1975 set up Ramsell-Naber Ltd in the UK to design and promote the use of electric resistance furnaces. In September of 2001 he became chairman of the ICME Technical Board, since when he has tried to develop the technical content of the Foundry Trade Journal and to raise the profile of ICME both within the cast metals industry and academia. He has also given technical presentations to a number of the ICME branches over the years. He has presented papers nationally and internationally on a variety of topics such as energy efficiency, environmental impacts of manufacturing and developments in furnace technology. He is always open to new ideas and actively encourage colleagues and friends to keep abreast of new developments and technological advances. He is a keen supporter of lifelong learning.

M M Hallett Award

  • Awarded to Inductotherm Europe Ltd
    Inductotherm Europe Ltd is the European furnace Division of the World leading Inductotherm Group. It manufactures and supplies from its UK plant Induction Melting and Automatic Pouring products to countries in Europe from Portugal in the west to Russia in the east. Established in 1971, Inductotherm Europe Ltd has become the dominant supplier of furnace equipment to European Foundries. Whatever your induction melting needs Inductotherm Europe Ltd has the products, technical expertise and experience to meet these requirements. Whether you need a small Precious metal melting furnace, medium size Non-Ferrous, Iron or Steel melting furnace, right up to a large high power Iron or Steel melting furnace system.

Meritorious Services Medal

  • Awarded to John Willetts Prof MICME
    John began his working life in 1964 in the laboratories of Duport Foundries and then Repton Foundry in 1966. Attending Wednesbury Technical College he was awarded a bronze medal from the IBF for my City and Guilds exam results. He left Repton to study Foundry Technology and gained a HND and a post HND qualification entitling him to full membership of the IBF. He cancelled his membership after just a few years for personal reasons. Joining Glynwed Foundries after college and spending several years with them he moved to Progress Foundry as Works manager and re-joined the IBF in 1988. Newby Foundries Ltd. purchased Progress Foundry and he was transferred to Head Office firstly as Technical Director and later as Production Director. Now retired, the final years of his working life were spent at Vanguard Foundry Ltd as Managing Director. In a very happy 10 years he oversaw the growth of the foundry from a turnover of £2M to £10M collecting an award from Cummins in the process in recognition of their quality and delivery performance to them. He retains a strong relationship with the ICME serving on both Branch and National Councils and was Branch President in 2007/08. In 2011 he was awarded the Long and Notable Services award for services to the Institute and he is honoured to now be proposed for the Meritorious Services Medal.

Best Student Award Casting Foundation Degree (Founders)

  • Awarded to Christopher Jay MICME
    Chris currently works for Union Electric Steel UK Ltd as a foundry production engineer. He was involved in the specification, design and commissioning of the furnaces to ensure that maximum throughput and minimum energy was used to achieve the companies goal of achieving the exceptional hardness uniformity required by their customers. Chris won the Worshipful Company of Ironmongers’ Jubilee Award in 2012 and part of the prize for winning the award was an all expenses paid visit to the 2012 World Foundry Congress in the city of Monterrey in Northern Mexico.

Best Technical Student Award (Ironmongers)

  • Awarded to Catherine Holt
    Catherine is 25 years old and has worked at Wallwork Heat Treatment in Manchester for six and a half years. She is one of a team of laboratory technicians working in the laboratory which runs 24/7. Her main job is carrying out commercial and aerospace testing, from case plots to hardness testing as well as daily calibration of all the laboratory testing equipment. She also checks the oil samples from the furnaces at Bury and Birmingham sites for the quench rates. In her spare time she is a girl guide leader.

British Foundry Medal

  • Awarded to Prof Prince N Anyalebechi BPhD CEng FIMMM
    ... The British Foundry Medal is awarded to Prof Prince Anyalebechi PhD, CEng, FIMMM of the Padnos College of Engineering and Computing, Grand Valley State University, Michigan, USA for his paper ‘Effect of process route on the structure, tensile and fatigue properties of aluminium alloy automotive steering knuckles’, published in the July/August issue of Foundry Trade Journal (Volume 186, No.3696, Pages 189-196). Professor Prince N. Anyalebechi is a tenured full Professor of Engineering in the School of Engineering of Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA, where he develops and teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on Materials Science & Engineering, Manufacturing Processes, Material Failure Analysis, Biomaterials, and Materials & Process Selection. He joined Grand Valley State University as an Assistant Professor in 2001 after serving as an Associate Professor in James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA and after almost 12 years in industry. From 1985 to 1996 and 1999 to 2001, he worked at Alcoa Technical Center, where he conducted fundamental and applied research on manufacturing processes and alloys used in the production of a variety of aluminum products. Professor Anyalebechi received his Ph.D. in Metallurgy in 1985 from Brunel University in England. He is a Fellow (FIMMM) of the Institute of Materials, Minerals, & Mining IOM3), UK and a Chartered Engineer (C.Eng.) of the British Engineering Council. He has won several awards including: (i) the 2011 Glen A. Niemeyer Outstanding Faculty Award for demonstrated excellence in teaching, scholarship, and service – the highest and most prestigious teaching award in Grand Valley State University; (ii) Grand Valley State University’s nominee for the 2011 State of Michigan Distinguished Professor of the Year; (iii) the 2003 American Society of Engineering Educator’s (ASEE) Annual Conference Best Paper award (Manufacturing Division); (iv) 1998 Most Outstanding Faculty Award in the Engineering/Manufacturing Sector of the Integrated Science & Technology Department, James Madison University; (v) 1991 TMS Light Metals Most Notable Cast Shop Technology Research Paper Award; (vi) 1991 Alcoa Technical Center Merit Award for Job Performance; and (vii) the Alcoa, Inc. Arthur Vining Davis Award for Technical Excellence (1990). He has published more than fifty-five technical papers in refereed journals, peer-reviewed conference proceedings, and reference handbooks. He is the editor/co-editor of six conference proceedings. He holds two U.S. patents and serves as a consultant to several companies in the metals industry.

Diploma

  • Awarded to Dr Mark Jolly PhD BMet CEng FIMMM FICME
    ...Prof Mark Jolly PhD BMet CEng FIMMM FICME for his paper ‘Energy saving in the foundry industry by using the CRIMSON single shot up-casting process’ published in the December issue of Foundry Trade Journal (Volume 186, No. 3700 – Pages 317-324). Professor Mark Jolly has worked in the field of manufacture of materials since 1982. After obtaining his Bachelor of Metallurgy from Sheffield University, Professor Jolly obtained his PhD in metallurgy at Cambridge University. From 1982 to 1995 he worked at a number of well-known research establishments, including T&N Technology and Battelle Research Laboratory in Geneva, on topics ranging from Rapid Solidification, Powder Metallurgy, Squeeze Casting, Metal Matrix Composites, Resins and Coatings for Foundries and Foundry Simulation Software. Professor Jolly has made a very valuable contribution in the field of computer modelling of casting, (since 1991). In early 1995 he joined the University of Birmingham and was specifically tasked with creating links with SME companies and encouraging the use of computer modelling and the latest casting technologies, which led to the creation of the Process Modelling Group. In this way the castings industry in the UK has benefitted enormously from the application of computer modelling in order to improve industrial casting processes. As evidence of this, many contracts were supported by industry within the Process Modelling group. The companies involved have included: NCR, Varity Perkins, Triplex Lloyd plc, Rolls Royce plc, Coupe Foundry, Cronite Precision Castings, Westleys plc and Transtec plc. In 1999 he created the Process Modelling Group after he was successful in his first EPSRC application on the “Fundamentals of Investment Casting” (FOCAST). He continued to receive grant funding working on projects as diverse as degassing of liquid metals and aluminium extrusion. He continued to be supported by industry with contracts from Sapa, Alcoa, Luxfer, Dubal, GKN, Grainger and Worrall and Depuy Johnson & Johnson and wide range of other companies. In May 2012 he took up his current position at Cranfield where his current research is focussed on reducing energy and materials usage in casting processes and glass manufacturing and he is the Cranfield University contact for FP7 Marie Curie IAPPS project at Depuy Johnson & Johnson “Development of Foundry Casting Methods for Cost-Effective Manufacture of Medical Implants”. Generally he has research interests in helping manufacturers improve the sustainability of their processes by improving their resource efficiency. Professor Jolly has over 300 journal, conference, book and industry publications. Professor Jolly is Chartered Engineer, a Chartered Environmentalist, a Fellow of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining, a Fellow of the Institute of Cast Metals Engineers (ICME) and a Member of TMS and the American Foundry Society. He has sat on the EPSRC Peer Review College since 2003. He was also the recipient of the ICME 2008 Oliver Stubbs Gold Medal and the University of Birmingham’s 2010 Josiah Mason award for Business Achievement.

Honorary Fellow

  • Awarded to David Fletcher FREng CEng FIM Hon FICME
    David has been the Honorary Treasurer for ICME since 2003, having been the National President in 1999 when he was a Director of Sheffield Forgemasters Ltd. He has also served as a Director of the then Castings Development Centre and Chairman of the Dti's Casting 2000+ panel as well as on the Board of the UK Manufacturing Foresight Panel. David began his career working for the Weir Group and later the Aurora Group, have attained a first class degree in Matallurgical Engineering and Management from Loughborough University. He joined the institute in 1965 and was appointed a Fellow in 1986. David has served as the President of hte Sheffield Branch and was awarded a Long and Notable Services Award in 1997 and a Meritorious Services award in 2005. As Honorary Treasurer David has always ensured that the institute meets its objectives as a charity to serve the training and development needs of members and the wider industry through technical events, the journal and training activities.

Long & Notable Service Award

  • Awarded to Dr Mark Jolly PhD BMet CEng FIMMM FICME
    Prof Mark Jolly, FICME, member since 1991. Professor Jolly is a Chartered Engineer, a Chartered Environmentalist, a Fellow of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining, a Fellow of the Institute of Cast Metals Engineers and a Member of TMS and the American Foundry Society. He won the Oliver Stubbs Award in 2008 and has made a substantial contribution to the Institute through the Membership Committee, as an assessor and mentor. He has sat on the EPSRC Peer Review College since 2003.
  • Awarded to Eur.Ing Steve Smith BSc CEng FICME
    Steve graduated from Sheffield University in 1980 with an honor’s degree in Metallurgy and joined the institute in the same year, he spent 14 years as works metallurgist and engineering manager at Hunt Brothers (Oldbury) Ltd leaving in 1994 to set up Hayes Hydraulic Castings Ltd. taking the position of Technical Director. In 1999 he joined Newby Foundries Ltd. where he is currently Technical Director. He has just retired as West Midlands ICME Branch President.

P C Nix Best Technical (Non Ferrous) Student Award

  • Awarded to Ryan Tunstall MICME
    Ryan is an apprentice with Alucast Ltd and is presently studying on an apprentice programme with Wolverhampton College.

REMET Modern Apprentice Award

  • Awarded to Antony Stone MICME
    Antony is a 20 year old man from Leicester, a third generation foundryman who has been around foundries all his life and often seen and heard about casting, this helped develop his interests whilst growing up. From a young age he’s been interested in all things mechanical and as he’s grown up he’s developed those interests. A keen model engineer who is in the process of casting all the necessary parts needed for a scale steam engine in his own small backyard foundry. Antony is employed by the John Taylor Bell Foundry, a family founded business that has been operating in England since1784, but moved to Loughborough in 1839. The business has been family run until the last Taylor family member passed in 1981 but the company then began to change hands through family friends and bell ringing enthusiasts who didn’t want to lose the industry abroad, with directors who were close friends of the Taylor family keen to see the company thrive and develop. The company's main profession is the casting of church ringing bells and their fittings and frames, as well as new casts they also refurbish existing bells and re-tune any that the desired church are unhappy with. His job is apprentice moulder but with a slight twist, as the company is the only purpose built bell foundry in the world and there being only one other that cast bells he is one of eight people in England who actively loam mould and cast bells. His daily activities see him using “strickles” used to make the two halves of a bell mould, using parts that date back to the early 1860s, once he has set the strickle the core is created on an cast iron plate, the core is built up within the inside perimeter of the strickle using common house bricks and coke, the coke acts as a venting system and the house bricks are strong enough to support the shape, the loam mixture is used like cement when building a house, it completely covers the bricks and coke, when the strickle is rotated it creates the core profile of the bell. A case is also made, this is again strickled but in an iron case already cast to the shape of a bell, the strickle is again turned and loam is use to build up the outer profile of the bell, where the lettering and any ornamentation can be added. All of the techniques and indeed loam mixture are passed down from generation to generation and continued to be used in bell manufacture.